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October 17, 2022

Saprea Retreat Helps Women Heal from Trauma of Child Sexual Abuse

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One in every four women in the United States is a survivor of childhood sexual abuse. These women often spend decades trying to overcome the trauma they endured as children. Trudy is one such survivor.

“Child sexual abuse is a type of pain that embeds itself into your soul. I didn’t realize how deep the pain and trauma went. I had locked it away for years. However, I started to really delve in and work to heal in my mid-20s. I thought I had healed,” she said.

Years later Trudy learned about the Saprea Retreat, an education service provided by Saprea, a global nonprofit based in Lehi, Utah. This retreat is where her story of learning how to heal truly began.

The Saprea Retreat is free of charge to any adult female survivor who was sexually abused at or before age 18. Three weeks each month, Saprea hosts survivors from Monday to Thursday. Participants gather in one of two locations (Utah or Georgia) for an immersive experience where they can  learn, reflect, and rejuvenate.  At the retreat, the women can participate in a variety of activities to help them learn how to heal from the trauma of sexual abuse. Following the retreat, survivors can receive additional education and support through online materials and support groups, a self-guided online course, and additional online resources.

“The survivor may be working, raising families, and contributing to their communities. Despite these successes, they are still affected, often deeply, by what happened in their past,” said Shelaine Maxfield, founder and board chair of Saprea.

Trudy recalls attending the retreat and having “a life-changing experience…I needed this retreat to really take a closer look at myself and understand how this particular type of abuse can impact a child and change the brain chemistry. It gave me a deeper appreciation for all that I have overcome.”

Since completing the retreat, Trudy has been inspired to be a bigger voice for those who are unable to speak and to continue to help others heal and grow. “Abuse does not need to dictate who we are for the rest of our lives,” she said.

Saprea wants all survivors to find the healing and support they need. “The Saprea Retreat helps women find hope in themselves and in their future,” said Maxfield.

More details about the retreat and the application process can be found on Saprea’s website at saprea.org. Saprea aspires for a world that is free of child sexual abuse. In this pursuit, we apply clinically proven, research-based best practices in providing healing and prevention resources.

One in every four women in the United States is a survivor of childhood sexual abuse. These women often spend decades trying to overcome the trauma they endured as children. Trudy is one such survivor.

“Child sexual abuse is a type of pain that embeds itself into your soul. I didn’t realize how deep the pain and trauma went. I had locked it away for years. However, I started to really delve in and work to heal in my mid-20s. I thought I had healed,” she said.

Years later Trudy learned about the Saprea Retreat, an education service provided by Saprea, a global nonprofit based in Lehi, Utah. This retreat is where her story of learning how to heal truly began.

The Saprea Retreat is free of charge to any adult female survivor who was sexually abused at or before age 18. Three weeks each month, Saprea hosts survivors from Monday to Thursday. Participants gather in one of two locations (Utah or Georgia) for an immersive experience where they can  learn, reflect, and rejuvenate.  At the retreat, the women can participate in a variety of activities to help them learn how to heal from the trauma of sexual abuse. Following the retreat, survivors can receive additional education and support through online materials and support groups, a self-guided online course, and additional online resources.

“The survivor may be working, raising families, and contributing to their communities. Despite these successes, they are still affected, often deeply, by what happened in their past,” said Shelaine Maxfield, founder and board chair of Saprea.

Trudy recalls attending the retreat and having “a life-changing experience…I needed this retreat to really take a closer look at myself and understand how this particular type of abuse can impact a child and change the brain chemistry. It gave me a deeper appreciation for all that I have overcome.”

Since completing the retreat, Trudy has been inspired to be a bigger voice for those who are unable to speak and to continue to help others heal and grow. “Abuse does not need to dictate who we are for the rest of our lives,” she said.

Saprea wants all survivors to find the healing and support they need. “The Saprea Retreat helps women find hope in themselves and in their future,” said Maxfield.

More details about the retreat and the application process can be found on Saprea’s website at saprea.org. Saprea aspires for a world that is free of child sexual abuse. In this pursuit, we apply clinically proven, research-based best practices in providing healing and prevention resources.